Celebrate the World’s Fair anniversary at these tastings and exhibits in Queens

Celebrate the World’s Fair anniversary at these tastings and exhibits in Queens

The 1964-1965 World’s Fair in Queens was one of the most memorable in history: the Pietà was flown in from the Vatican, Disney debuted lifelike animatronics, and the world felt like it was at the brink of war.

The legacy of that fair has lived on through the years by way of the iconic Unisphere and other architectural oddities that have come to define Queens, but most New Yorkers have long forgotten the details of the event’s illustrious history. 

To celebrate the World’s Fair’s 60th anniversary, Queens Theatre is hosting “Theaterama!,” a monthly series of events that will delve deep into the history of the momentous festivities that kicked off on April 28 through October 27. 

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The opening event, “Remembering the 1964 New York World’s Fair,” will feature a colorful visual history of the fair, including testimonials from people who attended it and a chance for audience members to share their own recollections, too. 

Other cool programs include the 1964/65 Fanfare historical tour happening on May 26, which will feature pop-up dance performances from different parts of the world, including China, different regions of Africa, the Philippines, Greece and other parts of the globe. The dances will happen all throughout Flushing-Meadows Park from 2pm-4pm and they’re free to the public. 

Another event on June 30, “Armstrong at the World’s Fair Revisited,” will pay tribute to the legacy and music of the jazz icon, who played a concert at the 1964 fair to a crowd of adoring fans. In Armstrong’s place will be the Alphonso Horne and Gotham Kings band, featuring two-time Grammy nominated trumpeter Alphonso Horne. 

But if there’s one thing all New Yorkers definitely love to do is eat, which is why we anticipate Taste the World’s Fare to be the most popular activation this year. Expect to devour international food from several Queens-based restaurants on September 22 from 3pm-5pm. If the Queens Night Market had any competition, this would likely be it.

* This article was originally published here

How A Better Use Of The Outdoor Areas Can Benefit The Hospitality Industry

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The outdoors can offer you so many ways to be creative; you only need to find the right way to express your creativity. You need to stop and think about the outdoor area you own and how you can utilize it to its fullest. You get more space Everybody must have at least once been…

The post How A Better Use Of The Outdoor Areas Can Benefit The Hospitality Industry appeared first on Harlem World Magazine.

* This article was originally published here

Here is how those famous wax figures are made at Madame Tussauds

Here is how those famous wax figures are made at Madame Tussauds

Since its opening in Times Square back in 2000, Madame Tussauds has become part and parcel of the character of the city. Sure, the famous wax museum is a tourist magnet, but New Yorkers have also come to appreciate the art form, welcoming new celebrity clay figures joining the roster of 200-or-so sculptures always on display at the museum. In a way, Madame Tussauds is our own mini-Hollywood.

A mere walk through the giant space at 234 West 42nd Street by Seventh Avenue is sure to catch you off guard: the wax figures are, to put it simply, life-like, almost identical to their human counterparts.

You’ll be excused by the masses when walking into one of the main museum rooms and kicking off a conversation with Matthew McConaughey, who will obviously not answer any of your prompts given his wax form.

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Madame Tussauds behind the scenes
Photograph: Courtesy of Madame Tussauds

Clearly works of art, the statues take about 10 months to produce, from start to finish, and given the lack of boundaries around them, there’s a need for constant attention and repairs—a process that itself requires the work of extremely diligent artists that spend their days in a studio hidden behind the glitz and glamour of the museum. 

For the first time ever, Madame Tussauds is offering museum-goers the chance to take a peek at the process: the museum will start leading behind-the-scenes tours twice a week on Mondays through Fridays, starting April 15.

We got the chance to experience the 30-minute walk-through a few days before its official debut and we’re here to report that the offering is well worth its $12 price tag (plus the price of museum admission), effectively joining the rank of best things to do in New York whether you’re a local or a tourist. 

We won’t spoil too much, but here are some really cool things we learned while spending time inside Madame Tussauds’ unique studio:

1. Celebrities are highly involved in the production of their own wax figures

Once the staff settles on the subject to be immortalized, the celebrity flies to a production studio in New York or Europe and spends hours posing for a series of photos and measurements that will guide the builders throughout the process.

The subject is specifically asked about his or her own preferences: what sort of look are they imagining for their wax counterpart? What do they hope to accomplish?

Madame Tussauds behind the scenes
Photograph: Courtesy of Madame Tussauds

The initial sit-down leads to a preliminary sculpture of the subject’s body and head from clay. The results are sent to the A lister’s team who will respond with notes and that back-and-forward continues right until the monument is completed in the U.K., sent to the U.S. and prepared for a public presentation.

Studio artist Matthew Hilshorst illustrates the importance of that relationship when discussing Jennifer Hudson’s wax figure. According to the artist, the nails on display were first sent to Hudson’s actual nail tech, who shared all necessary materials and colors to make sure that the monument would turn out as true-to-reality as possible. 

2. The launch of a new figure is a big event that’s very well thought out

Lest you think the unveiling to be any less important than the actual object on debut, think again: each celebrity usually has his or her way of introducing their chiseled selves to the world.

“Ronaldo did a Times Square takeover while J Balvin preferred to pull a few fans into the museum and surprise everyone,” explains studio artist Matthew Hilshorst.

2. It’s not just about the ‘who’ but also about the ‘when’

“We create a figure at a moment in time,” notes Hilshorst. 

Take Rihanna, for example. The artist has been a staple at the museum for years but was “re-introduced” to the public with a different figure right before her Super Bowl performance last year, this time wearing her 2018 Met Gala outfit.

The passing of time may also convince the staff to re-look at a wax figure. Al Roker’s statue, which debuted before his gastric bypass, was eventually archived and replaced with a thinner version of the weather pro.

Fun fact: if you take the tour, you’ll be able to glimpse at Roker’s pre-surgery face on display in the studio.

Madame Tussauds behind the scenes
Photograph: Courtesy of Madame Tussauds

3. Wear and tear is a big part of the story

The figures at Madame Tussauds are famously “gate-less:” there are no ropes or barriers preventing ticket-holders from getting up close and personal with the objects on display and taking pictures alongside them.

It should come as no surprise then that the structures need constant upkeep—which is where the studio artists team comes in.

Among the most common “surgeries” performed on the subjects are regular cleanup sessions of the makeup that may have stained a celebrity’s outfit as guests rubbed shoulders with him or her to take a photo, the re-installation of hair (all human and ethically sourced!) and the re-application of paint/makeup.

Every morning, one of the studio artists will walk through the entire museum and touch up any of the 200 figures on display needing a bit of work.

4. The outfits are just as impressive as the physical attributes

Plenty of the clothes worn by the figures are donated by the celebrities themselves or fashion companies.

Tour ticket-holders will be able to gaze at Taylor Swift’s actual 2009 Jingle Ball outfit, which is just hanging in the studio next to one of Michael Jackson’s instantly recognizable jackets.

* This article was originally published here

This new secret speakeasy is hidden behind a soda vending machine in Queens

This new secret speakeasy is hidden behind a soda vending machine in Queens

We can’t deny it: we’re suckers for any sort of speakeasy-like concept, especially if it involves properly made cocktails and “secret” entrances.

The latest entry on that list is The Newsroom, a bar-restaurant at 11-01 43rd Avenue in Long Island City found behind the facade of a newsstand complete with a soda vending machine. 

The space debuted this past September as part of a larger project that includes a new hand roll bar by Michelin star chef Michael Collantes. Dubbed Sushi Saint, the latter portion of the business has yet to debut—but visitors will be able to satisfy their penchant for food at The Newsroom until then. 

The Newsroom
Photograph: Courtesy of The Newsroom
The Newsroom
Photograph: Courtesy of The Newsroom

The menu is presented by chef Ricardo Cardona, the New York Yankees’ very own cook, and features a fusion of European and “nuevo Latino” flavors, according to a press release.

Outstanding items include a whole branzino stuffed with coconut rice and the Newsroom paella, made with squid ink, pulpo, shrimp, clams, chicken and an herb sofrito. 

The theme is also reflected in the available cocktails’ names: the Interview is made with Mezcal, coconut milk, orange blossom water and chocolate bitters while the vodka-based Front Page boasts matcha, lemon, honey and is garnished with edible flowers.

The Newsroom
Photograph: Courtesy of The Newsroom

There is also the Editors Punch, a rum-and-Chambord combo with notes of orange, lime, Grenadine and blossom bitters.

Departing from the sort of traditional speakeasies that were prominent during Prohibition, The Newsroom also presents eclectic live performances when open on Thursdays through Saturdays, including jazz nights and spectacles put on by aerialists.

Despite its “secrecy” and location, The Newsroom certainly does not feel like the sort of prohibited cocktail bar that has come to define a very specific era in American history. That being said, given the staff’s dedication to detail, the place is certainly worth exploring.

* This article was originally published here